FD1064 Cucamelon Seeds Mini Watermelon Miniature Fruit Home Garden Plant x10pcs

Price: $1.99
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Manufacturer Description

Growing is no hassle at all. Simply start them indoors the same time you would begin seedlings for cucumbers, and plant them outdoors at exactly the same time. In fact, are a little more cool-weather tolerant than most cucumbers, which is an added bonus should you get a late cold spell. The plants are also fairly drought-resistant, more so than cucumbers, they don't need the cover of a greenhouse, fancy pruning or training techniques and suffer from very few pests. The plants make pretty, high-yielding vines that can be planted really close together to get the most out of a small space, as little as 15cm (6in) between plants around a trellis. Cucamelons are also fine to grow indoors as long as they get enough light and heat, for example in a conservatory or by a bright windowsill in a warm living room. Sowing:Sow under protection in pots late February to April.Place seeds on end, blunted end pointing downwards in compost and simply push into compost out of sight. Water thoroughly and germinate at a temperature of around 24°C (75°F). When two or three seed leaves have developed, reduce the temperature to around 18 to 21°C (65 to 70°F). Cucamelons, unlike most cucurbits (squash, courgettes, pumpkins, etc), take a while to germinate, up to four weeks. The key factor to speeding this up is giving them enough heat. Usually a sunny windowsill is perfect, but under very cold conditions they can be popped into a heated propagator.Cultivation:Plant out late March in a heated greenhouse or late May in an unheated greenhouse, or later if growing outside. Plant two plants per grow bag or one per large pot. Keep the compost moist, always water around the plant, not the foliage. Harvesting:July to September.Harvest them when they are the size of a grape, but still nice and firm. The best for salads are the tender ones less than 2.5cm (1in) in length that have not developed many seeds. One of the annoying things about a regular cucumber is peeling and seeding it, no need

Product Features

make pretty, high-yielding vines Growing is no hassle at all Simply start them plant them outdoors at exactly the same time as little as 15cm (6in) between plants

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