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Kohlrabi Purple Vienna 150 Seeds Buy 2 Orders Get 1 Free Heirloom Microgreen #44

Price: $2.59
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Product Features

Buy 2 Orders Of Kohlrabi Seeds from this listing, Get 1 Order of Kohlrabi Seeds Free. Place the two orders in your cart and we will ship 3 orders in a packet. || FREE SHIPPING || NON GMO There are several purple kohlrabi varieties growing in the marketplace, including Azur Star, Early Purple Vienna, Dyna, and Kolibri. Distingushing purple from green kohlrabi in appearance is only skin deep, as both have kohlrabi's trademark ivory white flesh. Although kohlrabi gives the impression that it is a root vegetable, being a member of the Brassica oleracee (crucifer) family, its edible bulbous section, stems and leaves grow above ground. The swollen bulb of the purple kohlrabi plant is the part of this vegetable that is considered the most virtuous element of the plant. It is roughly rounded and somewhat heart shaped, its skin wrapping around itself in a circular motion with several thick stems that branch out into its edible leaves. The bulb is crisp, dense, succulent and sweet, similar in flavor to a turnip, with slight cabbage nuances. The leaves and stems are both succulent and tender. Purple kohlrabi's color is contained in the skin only, once peeled it reveals the same ivory flesh as it's more common green counterpart. Kohlrabi responds wonderfully to nearly all cooking methods. It can be shredded raw in slaws and salads, roasted or braised then pureed into soups, pickled, baked, or stir fried. Both the bulb and the greens make a delicious curry. Diced it makes a hearty addition to savory pies and casseroles. Referencing its origins, kohlrabi is German, with no translation, literally kohl (cabbage) and (rabi) turnip. Although it has definitive Eastern European culinary origins and has a long culinary history in Asia, it has never been a largely purposeful vegetable in America outside of immigrant communities. It is a fast growing (early maturing) vegetable which is best grown as a cool season crop for harvest in the spring and fall.

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